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Admitted to the Union - 29 December 1845

NATIONAL PAGE BOOKS HISTORY MEMORIALS MESSAGE BOARDS
PROJECTS RESOURCES VOLUNTEER WHAT'S NEW GOALS  - 2013
Family Projects


SITEMAP

Welcome to the great state of Texas.  

Welcome to Texas, Trails To The Past.  We are Charlie  (State Administrator) and Linda (Assistant State Administrator).  We are here to serve you.  Our goal is to add  your family history to this site with the goal of making our site one of the best, if not the best, Texas genealogy / historical sites on the internet.

We would be honored to include your family history to this project.

HISTORY

    The History is of Texas is much too rich and colorful to ever do it justice in such a setting. All that can be done here is a bare outline.

    Texas lies between two major cultural spheres of Pre-Columbian North America: the Southwestern and the Plains areas. Archaeologists have found that three major indigenous cultures lived in this territory, and reached their developmental peak before the first European contact. These were: the Pueblo from the upper Rio Grande region, centered west of Texas; the Mississippian culture, also known as Mound Builder, which extended along the Mississippi River Valley east of Texas; and the civilizations of Mesoamerica, centered south of Texas.  Influence of Teotihuacan in northern Mexico peaked around AD 500 and declined over the 8th to 10th centuries.

    The first historical document related to Texas was a map of the Gulf Coast, created in 1519 by Spanish explorer Alonso Álvarez de Pineda. Nine years later, shipwrecked Spanish explorer Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca and his cohort became the first Europeans in Texas. European powers ignored Texas until accidentally settling there in 1685. Miscalculations by René Robert Cavelier de La Salle resulted in his establishing the colony of Fort Saint Louis at Matagorda Bay rather than along the Mississippi River. The colony lasted only four years before succumbing to harsh conditions and hostile natives.

    In 1690 Spanish authorities, concerned that France posed competitive threat, constructed several missions in East Texas. After Native American resistance, the Spanish missionaries returned to Mexico. When France began settling Louisiana, mostly in the southern part of the state, in 1716 Spanish authorities responded by founding a new series of missions in East Texas. Two years later, they created San Antonio as the first Spanish civilian settlement in Texas.

    Within Mexico, tensions continued between federalists and centralists. In early 1835, wary Texians formed Committees of Correspondence and Safety. The unrest erupted into armed conflict in late 1835 at the Battle of Gonzales. This launched the Texas Revolution, and over the next two months, the Texians successfully defeated all Mexican troops in the region. Texians elected delegates to the Consultation, which created a provisional government. The provisional government soon collapsed from infighting, and Texas was without clear governance for the first two months of 1836.

    During this time of political turmoil, Mexican President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna personally led an army to end the revolt. The Mexican expedition was initially successful. General Jose de Urrea defeated all the Texian resistance along the coast culminating in the Goliad Massacre. Santa Anna's forces, after a thirteen-day siege, overwhelmed Texian defenders at the Battle of the Alamo. News of the defeats sparked panic amongst Texas settlers. The newly-elected Texian delegates to the Convention of 1836 quickly signed a Declaration of Independence on March 2, forming the Republic of Texas. After electing interim officers, the Convention disbanded. The new government joined the other settlers in Texas in the Runaway Scrape, fleeing from the approaching Mexican army. After several weeks of retreat, the Texian Army commanded by Sam Houston attacked and defeated Santa Anna's forces at the Battle of San Jacinto. Santa Anna was captured and forced to sign the Treaties of Velasco, ending the war.

    As early as 1837, the Republic made several attempts to negotiate annexation with the United States. Opposition within the republic from the nationalist faction, along with strong abolitionist opposition within the United States, slowed Texas's admission into the Union. Texas was finally annexed when the expansionist James K. Polk won the election of 1844. On December 29, 1845, Congress admitted Texas to the U.S. as a constituent state of the Union.


BOOKS

One of  our projects at Texas - Trails To The Past is transcribing and posting Texas Historical Books that are in the Public Domain (Not under Copyright protection).  At this time we have between fifteen and twenty books we plan to put online.  This is more of an editing / formatting / proofing  documents converted from PDF (Acrabat Adobe) files.  Please contact Charlie if you would like more information on this project.

A History of Texas and Texans by Frank W. Johnson

Types of Successful Men of Texas by L. E. Daniell


FAMILY RESEARCH PROJECTS

This section is dedicated to preserving the Family Research of individuals who have donated their research to Texas - Trails To The Past.  The initial project in this area is the work of Leaton Clark who has been researching his family history for over forty years.  Please contact Charlie if you would like more information on this project or if you would be interested in donating you research (partial or complete) to this project.

The Guerrero - Vasquez Family History


The Leaton Clark Collection

Leaton Clark is a family historian, living in the Texas hill country, who has been researching his family for over forty years.  Wishing to preserve his work, he has graciously decided to donate his research to Texas - Trails To The Past.  

His Texas ties are primarily in the Panhandle and South Plains area, but there are family ties across the state as well as across the country.  Among the surnames that will be found in this collection are Block, Clark, Lance, Neece, Strickland, and Walser


Unless otherwise stated, the source for all information is Leaton Clark


The Trammell Family History

The Vaden Family Research Center



VOLUNTEER

So, you would like to help, but your not sure how.

Here are some ideas.

1.  Donate your research to the website.  This could include Family Group Sheets, Biographies, Obituaries, Birth/Marriage/Death dates,  Bible Records, Family Records (especially those from war), Military Records, and anything else you would like to contribute.  This is a great way to help us grow.  We give due credit for all information donated to the TTTP project.
 
2.  Join our transcription team.  We are currently working on "Types of Successful Men of Texas" by L. E. Daniell.  This is an 880 page book that contains about 175 biographies.  We also have access to 15 - 20 additional books we hope to get online. 

3.  Contributing other data like cemetery transcripting, court house records, histories, etc.

4.  Assisting Others With their research.


 Please do not submit information from other genealogy websites, 
unless it is information that you personally donated. 
 We wish to operate with integrity 


Please contact Charlie if you would like to help with this project or if you would like more information.

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Last Modified - 17  March 2013
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